"Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls and Why Were They Forgotten?" A Lecture by Rachel Elior: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLit979B60Y

Enoch Son of Jared and the Solar Calendar of the Priesthood in Qumran Page 41: All these manifestations of the controversy may be summarized as follows. On the one hand was a deterministic perception of time, of heavenly origin, bound up with the cyclic laws of nature as reflected in a fixed solar calendar whose festivals fell not only on fixed dates of the month but also on fixed days of the week, a calendar maintained unchanged by angels and priests who attested to its divine origin, recording its heavenly character in their written documents and declaring, as it were, "It is in the heavens". On the other was a perception of time dependent on variable, human decisions, governed by observations made by ordinary mortals, as reflected in a changeable, lunar calendar, maintained by leaders who derived their authority from the people as a whole, by a court which heard testimony from any witness, took terrestrial interests and the good of the Community into considerations, and invoked, as a crucial principle, "It is not in the heavens".

The affinity between the holy angels, the heavenly  guardians of the Covenant, and the earthly guardians of the Covenant in the Community is conditional upon strict observance of the sabbath, as we learn from Jubilees, which lays emphasis on the sacred seven-based pattern; and on strict observance of the commandments and the festivals – appointed times – all of which are closely bound up with sanctity, puritiy, cessation of routine activity, and the maintenance of the sacred service as dictated by the calendar of weeks, that is, the solar calendar. These conditions are essential for the Community to be defined as yahad, a 'togetherness' or commonalty of priests and angels, joint guardians of the Covenant of sabbaths and appointed times, of sacred lore, and of a cultic and liturgical order common to heavenly and earthly beings, set out in an eternal sequence based on the weeks, sabbaths, and festivals of the solar calendar. (Rachel Elior: "The Three Temples", Page 182)

Calendar:

11QPs, XXVII, 2 - 11: David son of Jesse was wise and brilliant like the light of the sun; (he was) a scribe, intelligent and perfect in all his ways before God and men. And YHWH gave him an intelligent and brilliant spirit, and he wrote 3,600 psalms [ten psalms each day, the number of days being the number of months in a year times the number of days in a month, 12 x 30 = 360] and 364 songs to sing before the altar for the daily perpetual sacrifice, for all the days of the [solar] year; and 52 songs for the Sabbath offerings [364 divided by 7 gives 52, the number of weeks or sabbaths in a year, which are divided into four seasons of thirteen sabbaths each, for which the Songs of the Sabbath Sacrifice were composed]; and 30 songs for the offerings for the beginnings of months, for all the festivals and for the Day of Atonement [12 first days of months plus 18 days of the seven festivals or appointed times, according to the list of festivals in Leviticus]. In all, the songs which he uttered were 446, and 4 songs to make music on the intercalary days [Heb. peguim, designating the four 'extra' days added to the 360 to mark the changes of season and to make up the full solar year]. In all, they were 4,050. All these he uttered through prophecy which was given him from before the Most High. (Rachel Elior: "The Three Temples", Page 261)

Enoch:

https://de.scribd.com/document/168721987/Heaven-on-Earth-Helios-and-the-Zodiac-Cycle-in-Ancient-Palestinian-Synagogues

P. 31: Instead I suggest that the Helios figure was also intended to represent Metatron, the divine super-angel.

P. 32: Metatron is therefore more than an angel; he is a second deity who is "the lesser YHWH."

P. 44: Therefore the secret of the town mentioned in the Ein Gedi inscription may be the secret of access to or control of Torah knowledge.

Dr. Immanuel Velikovsky in "Worlds in Collision": The Tractate Erubin V, 22c of the Jerusalem Talmud records "the surprising fact" that the Temple of Jerusalem was so built that on the two equinoctial days the first ray of the rising sun shone directly through the eastern gate; the eastern gate was kept closed during the year, but was opened on these two days for this very purpose. (Page 318) In the pre-Exilic period it was held "to be of imperative necessity that on two days of the year the sun shone directly through the eastern gate," and "through all the eastern gates of the Temple arranged in line, directly into the very heart of the Temple proper." The eastern gate, also called "sun gate," served not only to check on the equinoxes, when the sun rises exactly in the east, but on the solstices as well: a device on the eastern gate was designed to reflect the first rays of the sun on the summer and winter solstices, when the sun rises in the southeast and the northeast, respectively. (Page 353)

Temple:

פולחן השמש בארץ-ישראל/ HELIOS IN PALESTINE

Month Day Date Weekday Biblical Festival

1.

1.

29.3.2017

Wednesday

New Month - Start of the First Quarter

1.

14.

11.4.2017

Tuesday

Passover

1.

15.

12.4.2017

Wednesday

Start of Festival of Unleavened Bread

1.

26.

23.4.2017

Sunday

Festival of the First Barley

2.      

1.

28.4.2017

Friday

New Month

3.

1.

28.5.2017

Sunday

New Month

3.

15.

11.6.2017

Sunday

Shavuot: Festival of the First Wheat

4.

1.

28.6.2017

Wednesday

New Month - Start of the Second Quarter

5.

1.

28.7.2017

Friday

New Month

5.

3.

30.7.2017

Sunday

Festival of the First Wine

6.

1.

27.8.2017

Sunday

New Month

6.

22.

17.9.2017

Sunday

Festival of the First Olive Oil

6.

23.

18.9.2017

Monday

Start of Festival of Wood-Offering

7.

1.

27.9.2017

Wednesday

New Month - Start of the Third Quarter

7.

10.

6.10.2017

Friday

Day of Atonement

7.

15.

11.10.2017

Wednesday

Sukkot: Start of Festival of Booths

8.

1.

27.10.2017

Friday

New Month

9.

1.

26.11.2017

Sunday

New Month

10.

1.

27.12.2017

Wednesday

New Month - Start of the Fourth Quarter

11.

1.

26.1.2018

Friday

New Month

12.

1.

25.2.2018

Sunday

New Month

1.

1.

28.3.2018

Wednesday

New Month - Start of the First Quarter

 

Year

Sabbatical Year

Added in the 7. Month

Wednesday = New Year

1881

Sabbatical Year

One Week

23.3.

1882

 

 

29.3.

1883

 

 

28.3.

1884

 

 

26.3.

1885

 

 

25.3.

1886

 

 

24.3.

1887

 

 

23.3.

1888

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

21.3.

1889

 

 

3.4.

1890

 

 

2.4.

1891

 

 

1.4.

1892

 

 

30.3.

1893

 

 

29.3.

1894

 

 

28.3.

1895

Sabbatical Year

One Week

27.3.

1896

 

 

1.4.

1897

 

 

31.3.

1898

 

 

30.3.

1899

 

 

29.3.

1900

 

 

28.3.

1901

 

 

27.3.

1902

Sabbatical Year

One Week

26.3.

1903

 

 

1.4.

1904

 

 

30.3.

1905

 

 

29.3.

1906

 

 

28.3.

1907

 

 

27.3.

1908

 

 

25.3.

1909

Sabbatical Year

One Week

24.3.

1910

 

 

30.3.

1911

 

 

29.3.

1912

 

 

27.3.

1913

 

 

26.3.

1914

 

 

25.3.

1915

 

 

24.3.

1916

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

22.3.

1917

 

 

4.4.

1918

 

 

3.4.

1919

 

 

2.4.

1920

 

 

31.3.

1921

 

 

30.3.

1922

 

 

29.3.

1923

Sabbatical Year

One Week

28.3.

1924

 

 

2.4.

1925

 

 

1.4.

1926

 

 

31.3.

1927

 

 

30.3.

1928

 

 

28.3.

1929

 

 

27.3.

1930

Sabbatical Year

One Week

26.3.

1931

 

 

1.4.

1932

 

 

30.3.

1933

 

 

29.3.

1934

 

 

28.3.

1935

 

 

27.3.

1936

 

 

25.3.

1937

Sabbatical Year

One Week

24.3.

1938

 

 

30.3.

1939

 

 

29.3.

1940

 

 

27.3.

1941

 

 

26.3.

1942

 

 

25.3.

1943

 

 

24.3.

1944

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

22.3.

1945

 

 

4.4.

1946

 

 

3.4.

1947

 

 

2.4.

1948

 

 

31.3.

1949

 

 

30.3.

1950

 

 

29.3.

1951

Sabbatical Year

One Week

28.3.

1952

 

 

2.4.

1953

 

 

1.4.

1954

 

 

31.3.

1955

 

 

30.3.

1956

 

 

28.3.

1957

 

 

27.3.

1958

Sabbatical Year

One Week

26.3.

1959

 

 

1.4.

1960

 

 

30.3.

1961

 

 

29.3.

1962

 

 

28.3.

1963

 

 

27.3.

1964

 

 

25.3.

1965

Sabbatical Year

One Week

24.3.

1966

 

 

30.3.

1967

 

 

29.3.

1968

 

 

27.3.

1969

 

 

26.3.

1970

 

 

25.3.

1971

 

 

24.3.

1972

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

22.3.

1973

 

 

4.4.

1974

 

 

3.4.

1975

 

 

2.4.

1976

 

 

31.3.

1977

 

 

30.3.

1978

 

 

29.3.

1979

Sabbatical Year

One Week

28.3.

1980

 

 

2.4.

1981

 

 

1.4.

1982

 

 

31.3.

1983

 

 

30.3.

1984

 

 

28.3.

1985

 

 

27.3.

1986

Sabbatical Year

One Week

26.3.

1987

 

 

1.4.

1988

 

 

30.3.

1989

 

 

29.3.

1990

 

 

28.3.

1991

 

 

27.3.

1992

 

 

25.3.

1993

Sabbatical Year

One Week

24.3.

1994

 

 

30.3.

1995

 

 

29.3.

1996

 

 

27.3.

1997

 

 

26.3.

1998

 

 

25.3.

1999

 

 

24.3.

2000

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

22.3.

2001

 

 

4.4.

2002

 

 

3.4.

2003

 

 

2.4.

2004

 

 

31.3.

2005

 

 

30.3.

2006

 

 

29.3.

2007

Sabbatical Year

One Week

28.3.

2008

 

 

2.4.

2009

 

 

1.4.

2010

 

 

31.3.

2011

 

 

30.3.

2012

 

 

28.3.

2013

 

 

27.3.

2014

Sabbatical Year

One Week

26.3.

2015

 

 

1.4.

2016

 

 

30.3.

2017

 

 

29.3.

2018

 

 

28.3.

2019

 

 

27.3.

2020

 

 

25.3.

2021

Sabbatical Year

One Week

24.3.

2022

 

 

30.3.

2023

 

 

29.3.

2024

 

 

27.3.

2025

 

 

26.3.

2026

 

 

25.3.

2027

 

 

24.3.

2028

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

22.3.

2029

 

 

4.4.

2030

 

 

3.4.

2031

 

 

2.4.

2032

 

 

31.3.

2033

 

 

30.3.

2034

 

 

29.3.

2035

Sabbatical Year

One Week

28.3.

2036

 

 

2.4.

2037

 

 

1.4.

2038

 

 

31.3.

2039

 

 

30.3.

2040

 

 

28.3.

2041

 

 

27.3.

2042

Sabbatical Year

One Week

26.3.

2043

 

 

1.4.

2044

 

 

30.3.

2045

 

 

29.3.

2046

 

 

28.3.

2047

 

 

27.3.

2048

 

 

25.3.

2049

Sabbatical Year

One Week

24.3.

2050

 

 

30.3.

2051

 

 

29.3.

2052

 

 

27.3.

2053

 

 

26.3.

2054

 

 

25.3.

2055

 

 

24.3.

2056

Sabbatical Year

Two Weeks

22.3.